GLAS Traditional Farm Buildings Grant Scheme

GLAS Traditional Farm Buildings Grant Scheme

2009 – ongoing

An annual grants scheme for the conservation and repair of traditional farm buildings and related structures for farmers in the Green Low-Carbon Agri-Environment Scheme (GLAS) 

An annual grants scheme for the conservation and repair of traditional farm buildings and related structures for farmers in the Green Low-Carbon Agri-Environment Scheme (GLAS) 

GLAS Traditional Farm Buildings Grant Scheme

The Heritage Council, in partnership with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine manages the GLAS traditional farm buildings grant scheme. Only farmers approved in the Green Low-Carbon Agri-Environment Scheme (GLAS) are eligible to apply.  The principal objective of this scheme is to ensure that traditional farm buildings and other related structures that contribute to the character of the landscape, and are of significant heritage value, are conserved for active agricultural use.  Grant amounts vary between €4,000 and €25,000. The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine make all grant payments on this scheme following certification by the Heritage Council. 

A grant award will not be for more than 75% of the cost of the works with a maximum available grant of €25,000.  The grant is available for the conservation of traditional farm outbuildings, including roof, walls, structural repairs, windows and doors. 

The grant is also available for other related farm structures including historic yard surfaces, walls, gate pillars and gates.  The key conservation principle of minimum intervention applies, that is, carrying out a repair to fix what is wrong but not setting out to do too much work. Works which are, in the opinion of the Heritage Council, restoration works, are very unlikely to be supported with grant aid. The process is highly competitive and it is expected that 50-70 projects will be supported each year. 

Conservation Consultant: Gareth O’Callaghan of Jack Coughlan Associates Conservation Consultants, Cork. Contractor: Donal Crowley, Drimoleague, Co. Cork.   Wildlife Expert: Conor Kelleher of Aardwolf Wildlife Surveys, Macroom, Co Cork.

To view images click on first image below and press arrow on the side to scroll through

This linhay building in County Tipperary is an interesting and architecturally significant building and was the recipient of a grant in 2010. A linhay (pronounced ‘linney’) comprises an open gallery at first floor level for the storage of fodder with enclosed livestock pens at ground level. These linhay buildings are medieval in origin and are found across southern England and also in Normandy from where they may have originated. The significance of this example lies therefore in the building type being rare for Ireland and secondly the Tipperary example displays an elegant formal design coupled with particularly fine levels of construction work. Works grant aided included the repair of the original linhay roof; repair of wall heads and walls generally, the replacement of lintels and the rebuilding of the later end bay. 

Conservation Consultant: Stephen Fallon of Fallon Architects, Cashel, Co Tipperary. Contractor: Dick McCormack, Kilross, Co Tipperary.

To view images click on first image below and press arrow on the side to scroll through

 A 15th century tower house is attached to the farmhouse which is surrounded by later 19th century farm outbuildings of very good quality stonework with slate roofs. Works grant-aided in 2011 included roof repairs to the barn, carthouse and byre alongside localised stonework and joinery repairs. An original lock box to the door of the byre is likely to date from the 1780s which may date the farm complex earlier than the 19th century date previously thought.    

Conservation Consultant: Laura Bowen, Kilcullen, Co Kildare.  Contractor: Paddy O’Connor, Calverstown, Co. Kildare. Blacksmith: John Forkin, Athy, Co. Kildare. Wildlife Expert: Scott Cawley, Baggot Street Lower, Dublin 2.

To view images click on first image below and press arrow on the side to scroll through

These barns on a small holding in Co. Donegal, whilst modest are representative of the special character of the buildings in this northern area of the county. Both barns were originally roofed with Roshine stone slate as evidenced by very heavy purlins throughout both buildings. The roadside barn is still partially roofed with Roshine stone slates which are fixed with pegs and bedded in mortar. This type of roof is specific to north Donegal between Dunfanaghy and Gortahork. A grant was awarded in 2011 for the repair of the original stone slate roofs to the roadside barn and minor repairs to wall, while the front wall of the barn within the farmyard was stabilised.

Conservation Consultant: Duncan McLaren, Dedalus Architecture, Moville, Co. Donegal. Contractor: Patrick Harkin, Gortahork, Co Donegal. Wildlife Expert: Caroline Shiel, Kinlough, Co. Leitrim.

To view images click on first image below and press arrow on the side to scroll through

A mid 19th century County Laois single-storey outbuilding forming an L-shaped block. The roof is a rare example of an ‘open’ slate roof where adjacent slates are placed with a gap between them. It is a more economical method using fewer slates and was primarily used for outbuildings. This roofing pattern is now extremely rare and generally only found on outbuildings in the midlands and south east. A grant was awarded in 2011 for the repair of the original slate roof along with repairs and reinstatement of external joinery to weatherproof the building.   

Conservation Consultant: Fintan Dunne Architect, Durrow, Co Laois in consultation with Cathal O’Neill Architects, Pembroke Road, Dublin 4.  Contractor: Family Own Labour.  Wildlife Expert: Conor Kelleher of Aardwolf Wildlife Surveys, Macroom, Co Cork.

To view images click on first image below and press arrow on the side to scroll through

According to the owner, this outbuilding dates from c.1700. It predates the main farmhouse and features on the 1837 Ordnance Survey map. It appears to have formed part of a cluster of buildings further to the west of the farmhouse. The structure appears to have been truncated from its original length with a mass concrete gable bookend but still retains much of its original character. It is constructed of masonry walls with a limewash finish and a slated timber roof. It features prominent masonry piers and a bell tower feature which was used to call farm workers to their meals.   A grant was awarded in 2012 for the partial repair of the slate roof, along with localised repairs to stonework and external joinery. 

Conservation Consultant: Fergal McGirl, North Great Georges Street, D. 1.    Contractor: M.J. Duffy & Sons Ltd, Jenkinstown, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Wildlife Expert: Tina Aughney of Bat Eco Services, Virginia, Co Cavan.

To view images click on first image below and press arrow on the side to scroll through

This building and its associated range and farmhouse, is a typical and an all too rare example of a south Kerry Farm dating from the late 19th Century.

The entire original grouping of buildings has been exceptionally well maintained over the intervening period. The building still retains its original character, including the original accommodation of two Cow Houses, a Stable and a Pig House, with timber floored lofts at either end of the range, including the original stone access stairs. The farm building is constructed in local sandstone with a timber structured and Valentia slated roof. A grant was awarded in 2012 for the repair of the original Valentia slate roof, along with localised stonework and lintel repairs.  

Conservation Consultant: Rod Robinson, Waterville, Co Kerry.    Contractor: Neil O’Shea, Waterville, Co. Kerry; Patrick O’Neill, Cahirciveen, Co Kerry; Michael King Construction, Killarney, Co Kerry & John Fitzgerald, Cahirciveen, Co Kerry.  Wildlife Expert: Gerard Tobin, Clonmel, Co Tipperary.

To view images click on first image below and press arrow on the side to scroll through

The linear building is originally thought to have been the same height but at some point in its history that section to the right of the archway was raised. 

Works grant aided in 2013 included localised roof repairs, repairs to masonry, repair and renewal of external doors and shutters, the renewal of decayed lintels and addition of structural ties.  

Conservation Consultant: Paula M. Murphy, Horse & Jockey, Co Tipperary.

Contractor: Michael Lillis, Cloughjordan Co Tipperary & Richard McCormack, Kilross, Co Tipperary &Michael Cahill, Cloughjordan, Co Tipperary 

Blacksmith: Ken Cavanagh, Modreeny, Cloughjordan, Co Tipperary. 

Wildlife Expert: Gerard Tobin, Clonmel, Co Tipperary. 

To view images click on first image below and press arrow on the side to scroll through

Explore More Programmes

Brú na Bóinne Research Framework

Brú na Bóinne Research Framework

The framework assesses current knowledge and research of this amazing UNESCO World Heritage Site and proposes a strategy for future research with a view to its sustainable management.