Bird Survey Guidelines: Traditional Farm Buildings

Bird Survey Guidelines: Traditional Farm Buildings

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

The Heritage Council has prepared guidance that surveyors must follow when undertaking bird surveys under the REPS 4 Traditional Farm Buildings Grant scheme. This is to ensure that the survey is undertaken in line with current best practice, and that the works are designed in such a way as not to impact upon the protected wildlife.

Many traditional farm buildings may be home to nesting birds. As these are protected by law, buildings in receipt of a REPS 4

Traditional Farm Buildings Grant may require a bat and/ or bird survey before any works commence.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
National Biodiversity Plan Submission 2008

National Biodiversity Plan Submission 2008

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In January 2008, the National Parks and Wildlife Service of the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government announced the development of Ireland’s second National Biodiversity Plan 2008-2012. The Heritage Council was invited to prepare a submission on the new plan which is provided here.

In making this submission, the Heritage Council sought to support Government in its international and national commitments concerning biodiversity and its protection, conservation and management. These include commitments under the Convention on Biological Diversity, the EU target to halt biodiversity loss by 2010, as well as several EU Directives and national legislation.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
A Guide to Habitats in Ireland

A Guide to Habitats in Ireland

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

To date the absence of a common standard has meant that agencies and individuals have been unable to provide data that was consistent or complementary. Such consistency in the work of habitat classification is recognised as following best practice.

The standard can also make a particularly important contribution in informing the development of programmes arising from major policy initiatives such as the National Development Plan, heritage plans and in the preparation of environmental impact statements for use in the planning proposals.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): This guide provides a standard scheme for describing habitats in Ireland.
Forestry & the National Heritage: A Review of the Heritage Council's Forestry Policy 2008

Forestry & the National Heritage: A Review of the Heritage Council's Forestry Policy 2008

Climate Change and Renewable Energy Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

This review of Heritage Council forest policy was carried out by a team of six foresters and ecologists at the request of Woodlands of Ireland. The review was carried out by collating and analysing published, grey, and oral information relevant to forest management in Ireland.

The emphasis of the study was on science-based knowledge, but the team also drew on its considerable collective experience of working in the forestry sector. Submissions were sought from all interested parties, and a public meeting was held to present draft conclusions followed by a discussion.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Sasha Bosbeer, Huw Denman, Jerry Hawe, David Hickie, Paddy Purser and Patrick Walsh
Ireland's Coastline Seaweed

Ireland's Coastline Seaweed

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

Seaweed is gathered as food, processed and used as fertiliser, forms an ingredient in many cosmetics and spa treatments, and is the subject of biotechnological and pharmaceutical research. This poster/publication explores the contemporary and historical uses of seaweed, the role of seaweed in biodiversity and provides references for further information.

Seaweed is one of Ireland’s least-used resources. As an island with a 7,000 kilometre coastline, located in the warm and fertile waters of the Gulf Stream, we have an abundance of many
different kinds of seaweed. Although we currently use only a small fraction of Irish seaweed, this situation is changing. 

Attention is turning to the sea as a source of food, energy, and raw material for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Ireland’s interesting history of harvesting seaweed is about to
begin a new chapter.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Shannon Waterway Corridor Study Seminar - Presentation Summaries

Shannon Waterway Corridor Study Seminar - Presentation Summaries

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Summaries of presentations made at the 2008 seminar on the Shannon Waterway Corridor Study.

In November 2008, the Heritage Council hosted a seminar to progress the work of its Shannon Waterway Corridor Study and to explore ways for all agencies involved in management of the

River Shannon to work together. You can download copies of the presentations delivered at the seminar below. Summaries of the presentations are provided in this document.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Passed to the Future: The Bishop's Palace

Passed to the Future: The Bishop's Palace

Corporate Publications Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The history of The Bishop's Palace, Kilkenny, the home of the Heritage Council since 2008.

Using the conservation plan methodology introduced into Ireland by the Heritage Council,
the historical significance of all aspects of the building and site were documented. Based on a
careful survey of its qualities, Consarc Architects drew up plans for the building’s re-use. 

The
Heritage Council, conscious of the rich tapestry of history that could be read in the buildings,
was anxious to demonstrate that 'heritage' is a living thing, and that having a respectful attitude
to heritage does not curtail creativity, or contemporary interventions.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Heritage Outlook: Summer/ Autumn 2008

Heritage Outlook: Summer/ Autumn 2008

General /

The Heritage Council's quarterly magazine with heritage news, events, opportunities and features.

In this edition - Áras na hOidhreachta: the archaeology of a palatial past - the history of the Bishop's Palace in Kilkenny, home to the Heritage Council and an important piece of our national heritage.

Also in this Issue:

- Celebrating Biodiveristy Week 2008 - How do we really feel about biodiversity loss? The Lichen Ireland project 2005 - 2008 and creating green infrastructure. Pollution in China, the wise use of wetlands, thatching and Castlecomer Discovery Park, Kilkenny.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Bat Survey Guidelines: Traditional Farm Buildings Scheme

Bat Survey Guidelines: Traditional Farm Buildings Scheme

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

Guidelines for the surveying of bats within heritage structures.

These guidelines have been developed for Ecological Consultants to standardise both the methodology for survey of structures within the Heritage Council’s Traditional Farm Buildings Scheme and the reporting of same. In developing these guidelines, we have drawn on a wide range of expertise and believe that the advice given is the best that is currently available. Bat surveys submitted to the building owner and the Heritage Council must adhere to these guidelines in order to satisfy grant requirements under the Traditional Farm Buildings Scheme.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Tina Aughney, Conor Kelleher & Donna Mullen
Air and Earth: Aerial Archaeology in Ireland

Air and Earth: Aerial Archaeology in Ireland

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The Heritage Council commissioned Mr George Lambrick to examine aerial archaeology in Ireland.

One of the initiatives identified by the Heritage Council’s Strategic Plan 2007-2013 is that archaeological research issues and practice in the widest sense should be more overtly and consistently identified and from time to time reviewed. These research issues should also engage more with what both specialists and local communities find interesting about the past. To contribute to this the Heritage Council commissioned Mr George Lambrick to examine aerial archaeology in Ireland. Aerial Archaeology is the practice of using aircraft (or in some cases satellites) to provide a high-level view of the landscape based on conventional photography and a range of remote sensing technologies. That review is presented here.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): George Lambrick