Heritage Outlook: Winter 2004/ Spring 2005

Heritage Outlook: Winter 2004/ Spring 2005

General /

In this issue:

WATER HERITAGE DAY 2004
Creating awareness during Heritage Week

REELING IN THE YEARS
The heritage value of archives

BUILDING ON THE PAST
The sustainable reuse of buildings

HERITAGE EVENTS • THE DISCOVERY PROGRAMME • HERITAGE COUNCIL GRANTS PROGRAMME 2004

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Heritage Council Annual Report 2004

Heritage Council Annual Report 2004

Corporate Publications /

Annual report of the Heritage Council, including financial statements for 2004.

Annual report of the Heritage Council, including financial statements for 2004.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Saint Brendan's Cathedral, Clonfert: Conservation Plan

Saint Brendan's Cathedral, Clonfert: Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The Conservation Plan process draws together all the elements of the built and natural heritage in a historic place, as well as providing a forum for all interested parties to come together and agree the way forward. Through this process, the congregation and local community have been empowered to participate fully in the decisions taken, and to engage with the experts and with the statutory and other authorities.

The policies contained in this Conservation Plan provide a detailed methodology for approaching the conservation of the doorway of the cathedral while recognising the importance of its setting within the cathedral and within the attendant grounds. The Plan also provides policies for conserving the other elements of the complex, recognising that the significance of the site as a whole is as important as the significance of its parts.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Dermot Nolan and Pat Ruane
Seeking Your Views on Water Quality: Feedback Report

Seeking Your Views on Water Quality: Feedback Report

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

This document is a record of the feedback to the consultation document and the seminar of 18th October 2003 and represents the views of the respondents expressed in writing or during the workshop and plenary sessions.

The Heritage Council identified the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive as a major work area with particular emphasis on the public participation aspects. To assist in developing policy, Council agreed to canvas opinion on current water quality and current and future water management proposals.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Saint Lachtain's Church, Freshford: Conservation Plan

Saint Lachtain's Church, Freshford: Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The Conservation Plan methodology, introduced by the Heritage Council in1998, was applied to St Lachtain’s Church in 2001 and 2002. It provides a practical vision for the repairs and conservation of the monument and for the future of its setting.

The Church of St Lachtain in Freshford, County Kilkenny is a place of great antiquity. This Conservation Plan clearly and unequivocally states the significance of this monument and gives the church a prominence in the ecclesiastical history of Ireland which had hitherto been largely unrecognised.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Margaret Quinlan and Timothy Foley
Waterway Corridor of the Shannon from Lanesborough to Shannonbridge

Waterway Corridor of the Shannon from Lanesborough to Shannonbridge

Landscapes /

A study of the area surrounding Lanesborough to Shannonbridge

Click Read More to view/download the appendices and maps

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): The Heritage Council
Waterway Corridor Study of the Shannon from Roosky to Lanesborough & the Royal Canal between Clondara to Thomastown (B)

Waterway Corridor Study of the Shannon from Roosky to Lanesborough & the Royal Canal between Clondara to Thomastown (B)

Landscapes /

A study of the area surrounding The Shannon River between Roosky and Lanesborough and The Royal Canal between Cloondara and Thomastown 

Click read more to view/download appendices and maps

Appendices for Waterway Corridor Study Shannon: Rooskey to Lanesborough and the Royal Canal Zipped Folder 3.4MB
Maps for Waterway Corridor Study Shannon: Rooskey to Lanesborough and the Royal Canal Zipped Folder

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Ireland's Boating Heritage: The Future? Seminar Proceedings

Ireland's Boating Heritage: The Future? Seminar Proceedings

Heritage Tourism & Recreation Museums, Archives & Cultural Heritage Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

This publication provides the findings of the seminar and the individual presentations made.

In 2003 the Heritage Council became concerned about Irish boats, both inland and sea-going, as a neglected aspect of our heritage. To inform itself, the Council commissioned Reggie Goodbody to carry out a scoping study of the heritage boat sector. Arising from this study the Council

decided to host a seminar on Ireland’s boats in 2004, to which people involved in any aspect of inland and maritime boats were invited to attend.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Heritage Outlook: Summer/ Autumn 2004

Heritage Outlook: Summer/ Autumn 2004

General /

Quarterly magazine of the Heritage Council, with news, events, opportunities and features.

In this issue:

MANAGING OUR OCEANS
How do we prevent over-exploitation?
THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY
thinking globally, acting locally
ARCHAEOLOGY IN CONTEMPORARY IRELAND
Challenges and opportunities
COUNTRYSIDE ACCESS • OUR HISTORIC HOMES • PILGRIM PATHS • HERITAGE EVENTS

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
The Hook, County Wexford, the Maritime Heritage of a Coastal Community

The Hook, County Wexford, the Maritime Heritage of a Coastal Community

Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

The leaflet provides information on the landscape, history and lifestyle of the people who have lived on Hook Head peninsula, County Wexford.

The long, narrow point of Hook (an old English word meaning a promontory almost surrounded by the sea), located in south-west county Wexford, forms the eastern shore of Waterford Harbour. Because of its peninsular nature, the sea dominated everyday life. Fishing, both sea and shore-based, was an essential activity for food and profit, as was harvesting of seaweed and shellfish from the shoreline.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council