Conservation Plan: Rothe House, County Kilkenny

Conservation Plan: Rothe House, County Kilkenny

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

Rothe House is one of the earliest and most important historic places in Kilkenny, and indeed in the entire region. The Conservation Plan methodology, introduced into Ireland in 1998 by the Heritage Council, provides a framework and a vision for the future of Rothe House.

The vision for Rothe House involves ensuring the protection, long-term survival and enhancement of the complex, in addition to promoting and interpreting the history of the house to the public.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Elizabeth Ozmin, Babita Sharma and Gerald Wait
Unpublished Excavations in the Republic of Ireland 1930-1997

Unpublished Excavations in the Republic of Ireland 1930-1997

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The Heritage Council’s Policy Paper On Urban Archaeology & The National Heritage recommended a complete review of unpublished urban excavations. In order to progress this matter the Heritage Council commissioned the a survey of all unpublished excavations in the Republic of Ireland.

The survey identified 3,168 excavations for the period between 1930 and 1997. A total of 1,353 reports were classified as unpublished (43%). Eighty-one reports were considered to be of national significance, while a further 340 reports were of regional significance and should be published in either a journal or as part of a ‘synthetic package’. 

Category 3 reports represent the largest class of unpublished material (431 excavations), and their potential for further publication needs careful consideration. Less significant excavations constitute a relatively small number of reports (186). The component of the backlog that can clearly be defined as suitable for publication in its own right accounts for 421 reports.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Oxford Archaeological Unit
Recording & Conserving Ireland's Industrial Heritage

Recording & Conserving Ireland's Industrial Heritage

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The Heritage Council is conscious of this often-neglected part of our heritage, and in this publication seeks to raise awareness of what we have as well as giving simple guidance as to how to record and conserve it.

The remains of our industrial past can be seen throughout the country: bridges, canals, railways and stores still in use, all bear testimony to the work of past generations. However, there are other signs too - derelict buildings, rusting machinery, lone chimneys marking the sites of once-thriving industries. 

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Fred Hamond and Mary McMahon
Archaeological Features at Risk: A Survey Measuring Recent Destruction of Ireland's Archaeological Heritage

Archaeological Features at Risk: A Survey Measuring Recent Destruction of Ireland's Archaeological Heritage

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This report examines how much of the archaeological heritage of Ireland has been lost and the vulnerability of the remaining portion.

The report indicates that in the areas studied, 34% of the monuments known to have existed have been destroyed. It suggests that in the years preceding the report the rate of destruction, far from decreasing through improved legislation and raising awareness, had in fact accelerated.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Muiris O’Sullivan, David J. O’Connor and Laurence Kennedy
Archaeology & Development: Guidelines for Good Practice for Developers

Archaeology & Development: Guidelines for Good Practice for Developers

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

These guidelines aim to produce a better understanding of the needs of archaeology in Ireland and to improve co-operation between developers (with their consultant archaeologists, architects, engineers and planners) and the statutory authorities in protecting the archaeological heritage.

They are intended to be complementary to the published policies of the government on the protection of the archaeological heritage and are not a substitute for the need for published guidance to planning authorities from the central government on archaeology in the planning process. The guidelines are in technical rather than legal terms, in order to help improve professional practice and procedures.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): The ICOMOS Irish Committee Consortium
Review of Archaeological Assessment & Monitoring Procedures in Ireland

Review of Archaeological Assessment & Monitoring Procedures in Ireland

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This study was undertaken as a first step in developing guidelines on how assessment and monitoring in archaeology should be undertaken in the future. 

There has been a dramatic increase in testing and monitoring in the last number of years, 94.5% of all licensed test excavations and 93% of monitoring have occurred since 1990. The study is based on audits and quality assessments of a sample of recent monitoring and assessment reports and on consultations with professional archaeologists involved with the authorisation and execution of testing and monitoring investigations. The results of this study showed up many problems with both monitoring and testing procedures and reporting.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Policy Paper on Urban Archaeology & the National Heritage

Policy Paper on Urban Archaeology & the National Heritage

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The recommendations set out in this document seek to reorganise the mitigation measures, administration and conduct of urban archaeology so that effected communities are better served.

The acceptance of the recommendations will secure long-term benefits for our heritage and for the urban communities which are experiencing development.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Policies & Priorities: Building Regulations & the National Heritage

Policies & Priorities: Building Regulations & the National Heritage

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This research aims to examine the impact of building construction law, regulation and practice on historic buildings, to investigate the situation elsewhere, and to make recommendations, where judged appropriate, for policy initiatives which might be taken in the area.

Research work was undertaken in several directions: drafting and circulation of a questionnaire on Building Regulations and their impact on historic buildings to the construction design professions - architects, engineers, and surveyors; drafting of a
similar questionnaire and its circulation to Building Control, Fire and Planning Authorities throughout the State; interviews with
interested individuals; and analyses of legislation, regulation and practice here and in selected countries abroad, notably
the United Kingdom and the United States.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Archaeology & Forestry in Ireland

Archaeology & Forestry in Ireland

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

Recognising the need for policies beneficial to the development of forestry in relation to environmental and man-made heritage, this publication is a review of the existing structures, and includes the author's recommendations towards aiding future policy drafting. 

With the increased interest in and awareness of environmental and heritage issues, it is hoped that this report will make a positive contribution to the progression of sustainable development strategies at all levels in Ireland.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Gina Johnson
Taking Stock of our Ecclesiastical Heritage

Taking Stock of our Ecclesiastical Heritage

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This volume includes papers given at 'Taking Stock of our Ecclesiastical Heritage', a seminar held by the Heritage Council in February 1997 in Kilkenny Castle. 

The aim of this conference was to draw attention to this important element of our heritage - the heritage of churches - by launching the Survey of Churches in Ireland, as well as giving advice onbasic care of churches and their contents.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council