Russborough House, County Wicklow: Conservation Plan

Russborough House, County Wicklow: Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This Conservation Plan is the outcome of an integrated study of Russborough Houses carried out by a team of conservation architects, archaeologists, structural and services engineers, building material consultants and landscape architects, with specialist advice on the care of the art collections.

The conservation plan addresses the following:


• Understanding the place
• The cultural significance of the place
• Identifying issues which may affect that significance
• Writing policies to address the issues
• Building in mechanisms for implementation and review

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Traditional Buildings on Irish Farms

Traditional Buildings on Irish Farms

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This publication outlines the significance of Ireland's Farm Heritage from the 'Big House' farm to small farmyards and how practices have changed over the years. It also provides insights

into how to protect Ireland's farm heritage for the future and offers guidelines for the repair and maintenance of traditional buildings and farmyards. 

Ireland’s landscape is enriched by its heritage of farm-houses and outbuildings, its field patterns and the nature of the boundaries that divide them. The landscape of Ireland is predominantly an agricultural one, and farmers have been its guardians. In times past, the occupants of
traditional farmhouses and their associated farmsteads were often also their builders. They made clever use of materials available locally and they built in accordance with a language of construction that was shared by their community.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Irish Walled Towns Network Action Plan 2006-08

Irish Walled Towns Network Action Plan 2006-08

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The first action plan of the IWTN.

The Action Plan 2006-2008 is set out in two main parts:
1: Eleven ‘Key Actions’ for late 2005/early 2006, (i.e. Immediate Actions); and
2: Twelve ‘Further Actions’ (i.e. Short Term and Medium Term) 2006-2008 are set out under the
following themes:
• Networking and Lobbying (3 no. actions);
• Conservation and Management (4 no. actions);
• Joint Promotion and IT (3 no. actions); and
• Education and Training (2 no. actions).

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Saint Brendan's Cathedral, Clonfert: Conservation Plan

Saint Brendan's Cathedral, Clonfert: Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The Conservation Plan process draws together all the elements of the built and natural heritage in a historic place, as well as providing a forum for all interested parties to come together and agree the way forward. Through this process, the congregation and local community have been empowered to participate fully in the decisions taken, and to engage with the experts and with the statutory and other authorities.

The policies contained in this Conservation Plan provide a detailed methodology for approaching the conservation of the doorway of the cathedral while recognising the importance of its setting within the cathedral and within the attendant grounds. The Plan also provides policies for conserving the other elements of the complex, recognising that the significance of the site as a whole is as important as the significance of its parts.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Dermot Nolan and Pat Ruane
Saint Lachtain's Church, Freshford: Conservation Plan

Saint Lachtain's Church, Freshford: Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The Conservation Plan methodology, introduced by the Heritage Council in1998, was applied to St Lachtain’s Church in 2001 and 2002. It provides a practical vision for the repairs and conservation of the monument and for the future of its setting.

The Church of St Lachtain in Freshford, County Kilkenny is a place of great antiquity. This Conservation Plan clearly and unequivocally states the significance of this monument and gives the church a prominence in the ecclesiastical history of Ireland which had hitherto been largely unrecognised.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Margaret Quinlan and Timothy Foley
The Care of Stained Glass

The Care of Stained Glass

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

A practical guide to the conservation and preservation of stained glass.

Ireland has a rich legacy of stained glass. Fine examples of the art can be found in public and private buildings across the country, but mainly in our churches.The work of some of the finest European, English and Irish artists graces great cathedrals, historic buildings and humble churches. This booklet is intended as a guide for the custodians of these treasures, to
assist them in their care and conservation.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Kilkenny City Walls Conservation Plan

Kilkenny City Walls Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

On behalf of Kilkenny Borough Council, Dúchas and An Taisce, Oxford Archaeology was commissioned by The Heritage Council to produce a conservation plan for the City Walls of Kilkenny. 

It is anticipated that the Conservation Plan will be of use for: 

• Improving local understanding of the walls and their significance
• Promotion of the recognition and protection of the walls
• Encouragement of management schemes for effective maintenance
• Guidance for repairs and conservation
• Protection of the setting from adjacent developments
• Improving access to the walls.

In addition, the Conservation Plan will consolidate the extensive documentation relating to the City Walls found in local records, historical mapping and national documents. The data can then be disseminated in a manageable form, from which the policies for protection and preservation can be developed.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Oxford Archaeology
Human Remains in Irish Archaeology

Human Remains in Irish Archaeology

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This publication sets out the main issues - scientific, legal and ethical - involved in the excavation and treatment of ancient human remains and arrives at some conclusions about best practice in this aspect of Irish archaeology.

Ancient human remains merit special consideration as archaeological objects for a number of reasons. Not least of all is their emotive power, offering startling and immediate contact with the dead and a powerful reminder of the inescapable fate of the living. To archaeological specialists they constitute a valuable historical and scientific resource, inscribed with evidence of the working life, living conditions, diet, traumas and diseases of past generations. To developers and planners ancient human remains bring added complexity to projects impacting upon the archaeological heritage.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Jerry O'Sullivan and Jim Killgore
Financial Support for Architectural Conservation in Ireland

Financial Support for Architectural Conservation in Ireland

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

Having observed the difficulties experienced by owners and funding bodies, the Heritage Council commissioned this research on the various methods of support and their effectiveness in providing access to funding and achieving high standards of architectural conservation.

Based on the findings of this research, a number of recommendations have emerged, which if implemented would, in the Council’s opinion, provide greater efficiency and quality as well as cost-effective support for our architectural heritage.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Portlaw Conservation Plan

Portlaw Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

Conservation Plan for the town of Portlaw, Co Waterford. 

  • Published by: The Heritage Council

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