171 projects receive funding under Heritage Council Grants Scheme

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From conserving thatch to red grouse, to the cabin where Shackelton spent his last hours, the Heritage Council has today announced funding for 171 heritage projects across Ireland under its 2016 Community-based Heritage Grants Scheme. 

171 projects receive funding under Heritage Council Grants Scheme

The Heritage Council has today announced funding for 171 heritage projects across Ireland under its 2016 Community-based Heritage Grants Scheme. The scheme supports the continuing conservation and development of Irish heritage through local community based groups.

Funding of €800,000 has been provided through the Heritage Council and the Department of Regional Development, Rural Affairs, Arts and the Gaeltacht and almost 400 projects across the country applied for funding. From conserving thatch to red grouse, to the cabin where Shackelton spent his last hours, protecting sensitive archives and so much more.

Conor Newman, Heritage Council Chairman, commented, “These diverse projects reflect our cultural identity and distinctiveness as a people. If properly resourced they have the potential to give back to the community and to the country for generations to come. They are a hugely popular initiative, and while we weren’t able to support all of the projects which applied, I am very pleased that so many projects will benefit. These projects keep threatened aspects of our heritage alive and provide people with an opportunity to be directly involved in developing the future of their places. Many of the projects reflect years of ongoing work at community level to protect our heritage for the future”.

Minister for Regional Development, Rural Affairs, Arts and the Gaeltacht, Heather Humphreys said,  “This targeted grants scheme is supported on a continued financial basis by my Department and has a very positive impact on a wide range of projects and people in both rural and urban Ireland. Among the projects which will benefit this year are churches, natural habitats, such as beaches and woodlands, local graveyards and numerous heritage buildings.

“Schemes such as this one help to conserve our heritage, support the local economy, boost tourism and make our country a better place in which to live and work. By continuing to invest in our heritage, we can show that historic buildings and places are not only an intrinsic part of Ireland’s heritage, but can also provide a real boost to job creation in the construction, conservation and tourism sectors.”