Audit Maritime Collections

Audit Maritime Collections

Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

This Audit of Maritime Collections was commissioned by The Heritage Council in July 2005 with the aim of assisting the conservation of Ireland’s boating heritage in both the maritime and inland waterway communities.

The objective of the audit was to ascertain the following:
• The location of maritime and inland waterways collections in Ireland
• An overview of what is contained in each collection
• An indication, where practical, of the condition of each collection
• An indication, where practical, of the conditions in which each collection is stored
• Whether the collections also contain paper records (archives, plans, charts and maps, photographs and drawings)
• Ownership of each collection

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Darina Tully
The Future of Maritime and Inland Waterways Collections: Seminar Proceedings

The Future of Maritime and Inland Waterways Collections: Seminar Proceedings

Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

Proceedings of a Seminar held at the Radisson Hotel in Athlone, Co. Westmeath on Friday 13th October 2006.

Further to its Audit of Maritime Collections and in support of its Museums Standards Programme for Ireland, the Heritage Council hosted a one-day seminar on the Future of Maritime and Inland
Waterways Collections in Ireland.

A selection of conservators, collectors, museum curators, and practitioners discussed the following themes:
• Maritime and Inland Waterway Collections are an intrinsic part of the Ireland’s heritage
• How can such collections be safeguarded in all their variety and number?
• How can decisions be made on what to retain?
• How can we move ahead to ensure a range of collections reflecting this important aspect of
our heritage?

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Irish Walled Towns Network: Feedback

Irish Walled Towns Network: Feedback

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

Summary of feedback:

• 18 Walled Towns/Cities organised events on Irish Walled Towns’ Day 2006. Events included family fun-days, concerts, guided walks, etc.;
• Heritage Officers, Heritage Groups, local communities and businesses, Government Ministers, Local Authority Councillors and Officers
were all involved in the organisation and launching of the all-island events;
• The Network’s events were given excellent media coverage from national and local press, local radio, etc; (see Appendix E);
• The Heritage Council distributed over 300 Council T-shirts and baseball hats throughout Ireland on Irish Walled Towns’ Day;
• Two Walled Towns Conferences were organised in Kilmallock and Dublin;
• Photographic competitions were launched in 10 Walled Towns (north and south);
• The event has grown significantly since the first ever all-island event of 2005;
• Approximately 4,000 people took part in the IWTN’s celebratory Irish Walled Towns’ Day in 2006;
• Irish Walled Towns’ Day is particularly important to historic walled towns located outside the Greater Dublin Area (GDA);
• The local photographic competition period for entries will close on the 29thSeptember 2006 and the national winners will be announced at the inaugural Irish Walled Towns Network Gala Dinner on the 9thNovember 2006 in the D Hotel, Drogheda

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Landscape Character Assesment: Review Forms

Landscape Character Assesment: Review Forms

Landscapes /

Supplementary information to the final Landscape Character Assessment.

Completed landscape character review forms for each county in Ireland undertaken as part of the Landscape Character Assessment Baseline Audit.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Julie Martin Associates in association with Alison Farmer Associates
Literature Review on the Impacts of Boatwash on the Heritage of Ireland’s Inland Waterways

Literature Review on the Impacts of Boatwash on the Heritage of Ireland’s Inland Waterways

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity Museums, Archives & Cultural Heritage /

The impact of boat-wash on the natural and cultural heritage of Ireland’s waterways was identified as an important issue in the Waterways Corridor Studies carried betweeen 2001 and 2006. To further investigate this, in 2006 the Heritage Council commissioned Hydraulics & Maritime Research Centre UCC to undertake a Literature Review on research carried out to date and current practice in relation to boat-wash.

The specific impacts examined were:

  • Ecological impact - terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna, and terrestrial and aquatic habitats;
  • Cultural heritage impact - underwater archaeology, and upstanding archaeological structures such as crannógs, landing places, harbours, piers and bridges from medieval times to the mid-20th century;
  • Hydro-morphological impact - river and canal channels, river and canal banks, different soil types to assess their susceptibility to erosion, sediment mobilisation and depositional patterns, navigational and engineering structures.

This review provides an overview of the findings, methodologies and mitigation strategies used elsewhere. It will inform a second stage of research involving field study at a later stage.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): J. Murphy, G. Morgan and O. Power
Waterways Corridor Study: Appendix 3 - Industrial Heritage

Waterways Corridor Study: Appendix 3 - Industrial Heritage

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

The following report comprises the results of a desk-based industrial survey of the area
surrounding the River Shannon and a field survey of the corridor through which it flows.

The objective of the industrial heritage component of the study is to identify and assess the distinctive aspects of the industrial heritage and to provide an inventory of the extant sites within the Waterway Corridor.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Cultural Resource Development Services​
Ireland's Historic Churches and Graveyards

Ireland's Historic Churches and Graveyards

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

Information and guidance on the conservation and management of historic graveyards and churches.

Historic graveyards are very different in their character from modern cemeteries that are often described as ‘Lawn Cemeteries’. The latter are usually laid out in neat rectangular burial plots that are accessed by a network of pathways. In these modern cemeteries the surface of the ground is level and has the appearance of a lawn because the cemetery has not been used as a burial place over many centuries. The opposite is true for historic graveyards some of which have been used as burial grounds for over a millennium.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Lucan Village Design Statement

Lucan Village Design Statement

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

A Village Design Statement (VDS) is a community based document that describes the qualities and characteristics of a settlement. It sets out design guidance for future development and can influence planning applications and decisions.

The VDS was produced through an extensive community consultation programme combined with desk-based study. This included an introductory meeting with community members, distribution of a key issues leaflet and questionnaires, and a series of workshops involving a wide cross section of the community including adults, children, and young people. Over 60 questionnaires were completed and over 75 people attended the main workshop.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Ireland's Sharks and Rays

Ireland's Sharks and Rays

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

Sharks are some of the most threatened living creatures the ocean. Despite their fierce reputation, more people are killed each year worldwide by defective toasters than by shark attacks. Over 67 species of sharks, skates and rays live in Irish waters. Find out more with the Heritage Council poster, Ireland’s Sharks & Rays.

Sharks and rays have been swimming the world’s oceans for over four hundred million years. That’s one hundred million years before the first dinosaurs appeared
on land!

A wide variety of sharks and rays inhabit Irish waters, including 39 species of sharks and 28 species of skates and rays. Members of this diverse group can be found in all our seas, ranging from shallow estuaries down to depths of 2000m or more in the Atlantic.

Ireland's Maritime Archaeology

Ireland's Maritime Archaeology

Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

This publication provides an overview of maritime archaeology from the Mesolithic period to the archaeology of the modern coastline.

Ireland’s island story is written on its seashore. About ten thousand years ago, our first human
settlers – hunter-gatherers of the Mesolithic era - came here by boat. Since then, people have
lived, worked, travelled and buried their dead around Ireland’s coastal landscapes - using the
sea as a source of food, raw materials, as a means of travel and communications and as a place
to build communities.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council