Ireland's Coastal Geology

Ireland's Coastal Geology

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

Information leaflet on the geology of Ireland.

Whilst the coast offers excellent opportunities to see all types of geology in cliff exposures, it also shows thegeomorphology – the development of different coastal landforms. The range of landforms produced is enormous, and they are all dynamic – the changes which occur within people’s lifetimes are extremely rapid compared to some geological changes.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Literature Review on the Impacts of Boatwash on the Heritage of Ireland’s Inland Waterways

Literature Review on the Impacts of Boatwash on the Heritage of Ireland’s Inland Waterways

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity Museums, Archives & Cultural Heritage /

The impact of boat-wash on the natural and cultural heritage of Ireland’s waterways was identified as an important issue in the Waterways Corridor Studies carried betweeen 2001 and 2006. To further investigate this, in 2006 the Heritage Council commissioned Hydraulics & Maritime Research Centre UCC to undertake a Literature Review on research carried out to date and current practice in relation to boat-wash.

The specific impacts examined were:

  • Ecological impact - terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna, and terrestrial and aquatic habitats;
  • Cultural heritage impact - underwater archaeology, and upstanding archaeological structures such as crannógs, landing places, harbours, piers and bridges from medieval times to the mid-20th century;
  • Hydro-morphological impact - river and canal channels, river and canal banks, different soil types to assess their susceptibility to erosion, sediment mobilisation and depositional patterns, navigational and engineering structures.

This review provides an overview of the findings, methodologies and mitigation strategies used elsewhere. It will inform a second stage of research involving field study at a later stage.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): J. Murphy, G. Morgan and O. Power
Waterways Corridor Study: Appendix 3 - Industrial Heritage

Waterways Corridor Study: Appendix 3 - Industrial Heritage

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

The following report comprises the results of a desk-based industrial survey of the area
surrounding the River Shannon and a field survey of the corridor through which it flows.

The objective of the industrial heritage component of the study is to identify and assess the distinctive aspects of the industrial heritage and to provide an inventory of the extant sites within the Waterway Corridor.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Cultural Resource Development Services​
Ireland's Sharks and Rays

Ireland's Sharks and Rays

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

Sharks are some of the most threatened living creatures the ocean. Despite their fierce reputation, more people are killed each year worldwide by defective toasters than by shark attacks. Over 67 species of sharks, skates and rays live in Irish waters. Find out more with the Heritage Council poster, Ireland’s Sharks & Rays.

Sharks and rays have been swimming the world’s oceans for over four hundred million years. That’s one hundred million years before the first dinosaurs appeared
on land!

A wide variety of sharks and rays inhabit Irish waters, including 39 species of sharks and 28 species of skates and rays. Members of this diverse group can be found in all our seas, ranging from shallow estuaries down to depths of 2000m or more in the Atlantic.

Jellyfish in our Coastal Seas

Jellyfish in our Coastal Seas

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

This publication examines the different types of jellyfish which can be found in Irish waters. The life-cycle of the jellyfish, their habitats, jellyfish as food for other marine animals, and their impacts on humans is also outlined.

Ireland has five indigenous jellyfish species: Barrel, Blue, Common (Moon), Compass, and Lion’s Mane. A sixth species (Pelagia noctiluca) also occurs, but as it is an oceanic species it only occasionally makes an appearance in our coastal waters. Contrary to what you may think, jellyfish are not carried at the whim of ocean currents and tides on to our beaches. Many jellyfish maintain their positions by swimming down when the tide is going out, and swimming up when the tide is coming in. In this way they can stay in their preferred habitats.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Ireland's Coastal Heritage

Ireland's Coastal Heritage

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity Underwater & Maritime Heritage /

This publication highlights the threats to Ireland’s coastline, providing many little-known facts about our coastal heritage.

The island of Ireland has a long and complex coastline in relation to its land area. This interface between land and sea contains some of the finest parts of our natural and man-made heritage. The natural heritage includes rocks, marine and coastal habitats and marine life, including plankton, shellfish, fish, seabirds, whales and seals. Our human heritage is rich and varied including coastal and island communities, traditional boats, historical fishing methods, shipwrecks, and coastal archaeology.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Conserving and Enhancing Wildlife in Towns and Villages: A Guide for Local Community Groups

Conserving and Enhancing Wildlife in Towns and Villages: A Guide for Local Community Groups

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

Towns and villages can support a surprisingly wide range of wildlife habitats and species of local, or even national conservation interest. This guide provides advice to those who want to take action to conserve, protect and enhance wildlife in their town or village.

The importance of ecologically friendly management of areas in or around towns or villages is recognised in a number of competitions, awards and grants, including the Heritage Council Wildlife and Local Heritage Grants and the Tidy Towns Competition, organised by the
Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government .If your community group is interested in applying for or participating in either these or similar grants or competitions, this guide will be of relevance to you.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
‘Pilot’ Rural Renewal Scheme for the Upper Shannon Area: Submission to the Department of Finance – Final Report

‘Pilot’ Rural Renewal Scheme for the Upper Shannon Area: Submission to the Department of Finance – Final Report

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

This report provides a detailed assessment of the impact that the ‘Pilot’ Rural Renewal Tax Scheme for the Upper Shannon Area has had on lands adjacent to the River Shannon and hence the heritage of the River Shannon Waterway Corridor; a ‘waterway corridor area’ of international significance.

The assessment focuses on the resulting impact of increased development pressures on the heritage within the River Shannon Corridor and the implications for the planning and development system within this area. Four detailed case studies are provided (two case studies each for Counties Leitrim and Roscommon), in order to illustrate the long-term impact that the tax incentive scheme will have on the River Shannon Corridor Area.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Integrating Policies for Ireland's Inland Waterways

Integrating Policies for Ireland's Inland Waterways

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

This policy paper has been written in the light of heritage policy developments (the
National Heritage Plan and the National Biodiversity Plan) and the establishment of Waterways Ireland.

Notwithstanding these welcome developments, Ireland’s inland waterways and their corridors

still urgently need a strategic approach. Waterways Ireland’s remit covers most of Ireland’s
waterways although some, in particular several disused navigations, are not clearly the
responsibility of any agency. This document proposes a possible direction for a concerted and
co-ordinated effort to ensure that the heritage, social, and economic value of all of Ireland’s
waterways is enhanced.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Seeking Your Views on Water Quality: Feedback Report

Seeking Your Views on Water Quality: Feedback Report

Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

This document is a record of the feedback to the consultation document and the seminar of 18th October 2003 and represents the views of the respondents expressed in writing or during the workshop and plenary sessions.

The Heritage Council identified the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive as a major work area with particular emphasis on the public participation aspects. To assist in developing policy, Council agreed to canvas opinion on current water quality and current and future water management proposals.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council