Lemanaghan, County Offaly: Conservation Plan

Lemanaghan, County Offaly: Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

The Conservation Plan for Lemanaghan, County Offaly, provides a framework for  the  conservation  of  the  historic  place.  The authors have gathered  and  summarised a body of knowledge leading to an understanding of the significance of the complex. The plan sets out principles and formulates appropriate policies to protect that significance.

The Plan has established that Lemanaghan is:
• A sacred place of great antiquity
• A place containing buildings of architectural significance
• A place rich in documentary history and archaeological potential
• A place where there is a long tradition of devotional practice
• A place 'apart', possessing a strong sense of being untouched by the modern world

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Margaret Quinlan and Rachel Moss
Irish walled Towns Network: Feedback

Irish walled Towns Network: Feedback

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

Feedback from 20 participating towns/ cities in Irish Walled Towns’ Day and a comparison with events in 2006.

The Heritage Council of Ireland established the Irish Walled Towns Network (IWTN) in April 2005
‘to unite and co-ordinate the strategic efforts of local authorities involved in the management, conservation and enhancement of historic walled towns in Ireland, both North and South’
The Irish Walled Towns Network is formally linked to the International Walled Towns Friendship Circle (IWTFC) which is the international association for the sustainable development of walled towns, walled cities and fortified historic towns.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Newtown Jerpoint, County Kilkenny: Conservation Plan

Newtown Jerpoint, County Kilkenny: Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

On behalf of the owner of Newtown Jerpoint  and Kilkenny County Council, in partnership with the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government and the Office of Public Works, the Heritage Council commissioned Oxford Archaeology to produce a Conservation Plan for the site of Newtown Jerpoint, County Kilkenny.

Newtown is a deserted medieval town, dating back to c. AD 1200, when it was founded near a crossing point on the River Nore not far from Thomastown and the Cistercian Abbey of Jerpoint. The site contains the standing remains of St Nicholas’ Church and a domestic tower, both of which are partly overgrown and tending towards dilapidation. The site also contains the well-preserved outlines of burgage plots, some of which contain the remains of house platforms which have survived despite clearing works on the site in the 19th century

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Oxford Archaeology
Irish Walled Towns Network: Feedback

Irish Walled Towns Network: Feedback

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

Summary of feedback:

• 18 Walled Towns/Cities organised events on Irish Walled Towns’ Day 2006. Events included family fun-days, concerts, guided walks, etc.;
• Heritage Officers, Heritage Groups, local communities and businesses, Government Ministers, Local Authority Councillors and Officers
were all involved in the organisation and launching of the all-island events;
• The Network’s events were given excellent media coverage from national and local press, local radio, etc; (see Appendix E);
• The Heritage Council distributed over 300 Council T-shirts and baseball hats throughout Ireland on Irish Walled Towns’ Day;
• Two Walled Towns Conferences were organised in Kilmallock and Dublin;
• Photographic competitions were launched in 10 Walled Towns (north and south);
• The event has grown significantly since the first ever all-island event of 2005;
• Approximately 4,000 people took part in the IWTN’s celebratory Irish Walled Towns’ Day in 2006;
• Irish Walled Towns’ Day is particularly important to historic walled towns located outside the Greater Dublin Area (GDA);
• The local photographic competition period for entries will close on the 29thSeptember 2006 and the national winners will be announced at the inaugural Irish Walled Towns Network Gala Dinner on the 9thNovember 2006 in the D Hotel, Drogheda

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Waterways Corridor Study: Appendix 3 - Industrial Heritage

Waterways Corridor Study: Appendix 3 - Industrial Heritage

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology Natural Heritage & Biodiversity /

The following report comprises the results of a desk-based industrial survey of the area
surrounding the River Shannon and a field survey of the corridor through which it flows.

The objective of the industrial heritage component of the study is to identify and assess the distinctive aspects of the industrial heritage and to provide an inventory of the extant sites within the Waterway Corridor.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
  • Author(s): Cultural Resource Development Services​
Ireland's Historic Churches and Graveyards

Ireland's Historic Churches and Graveyards

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

Information and guidance on the conservation and management of historic graveyards and churches.

Historic graveyards are very different in their character from modern cemeteries that are often described as ‘Lawn Cemeteries’. The latter are usually laid out in neat rectangular burial plots that are accessed by a network of pathways. In these modern cemeteries the surface of the ground is level and has the appearance of a lawn because the cemetery has not been used as a burial place over many centuries. The opposite is true for historic graveyards some of which have been used as burial grounds for over a millennium.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Lucan Village Design Statement

Lucan Village Design Statement

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

A Village Design Statement (VDS) is a community based document that describes the qualities and characteristics of a settlement. It sets out design guidance for future development and can influence planning applications and decisions.

The VDS was produced through an extensive community consultation programme combined with desk-based study. This included an introductory meeting with community members, distribution of a key issues leaflet and questionnaires, and a series of workshops involving a wide cross section of the community including adults, children, and young people. Over 60 questionnaires were completed and over 75 people attended the main workshop.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
Repositioning Irish Archaeology in the Knowledge Society

Repositioning Irish Archaeology in the Knowledge Society

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This publication attempts to set out a new framework for Irish archaeology to work within as a result of increasing development-led activity since the early 1990s.

In terms of its constituent sectors, archaeology could now be regarded predominantly as a business domain which operates in a competitive economic climate and focuses on generating information. This situation is radically different from the previous dominance of employment in the
State and education sectors with the clear focus on research which characterised earlier decades.

In response to these markedly changed circumstances and the consequential impact of new problems and challenges, a Foresight Study, leading to the production of this report, was initiated in 2004 by the UCD School of Archaeology, University College Dublin.

  • Published by: University College Dublin
Farming and Archaeology

Farming and Archaeology

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This publication provides a guide for farmers on how to recognise and protect important archaeology that may be on their land. 

Archaeological monuments such as moated sites and ringforts are the former homesteads of previous farming communities. Farming has been a vital force in developing our heritage and modern non-intrusive farming practices continue to preserve and shape our historic landscapes. This valuable legacy is something we should try to understand, cherish and protect for ourselves and for future generations.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council
St Mary's Church and Graveyard, Kilkenny: Conservation Plan

St Mary's Church and Graveyard, Kilkenny: Conservation Plan

Built/Urban Heritage & Archaeology /

This conservation plan is the outcome of a conservation-focused study of St. Mary’s Church and Graveyard in the centre of Kilkenny City. The study team was comprised of archaeologists, building history researchers, a structural engineer, conservation architects, building and stone material consultants, and a landscape architect.

The plan includes a brief historical background study of St Mary’s Church and Graveyard, a detailed scaled survey of the site and a physical study of the site, its monuments and

buildings as they are currently. These studies have helped to lead to an understanding of the site and its components, their contribution to the integrity of the site, and the issues it faces.

  • Published by: The Heritage Council